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Basic Drug Info
Drug Name:Prochlorperazine
Manufacturer:G&W Laboratories, Inc.
Other Info:



Clinical Trials:


Indications and Usage
Prochlorperazine 25 mg suppositories are indicated in the control of severe nausea and vomiting in adults.
Nausea -- An unpleasant sensation in the stomach usually accompanied by the urge to vomit. Common causes are early pregnancy, sea and motion sickness, emotional stress, intense pain, food poisoning, and various enteroviruses.

Vomiting -- The forcible expulsion of the contents of the STOMACH through the MOUTH.

Contraindications

Do not use in comatose states or in the presence of large amounts of central nervous system depressants (alcohol, barbiturates, narcotics, etc.).Do not use in pediatric surgery.Do not use in children under 2 years of age or under 20 lbs.

Do not use in children for conditions for which dosage has not been established.
Warnings

Increased Mortality in Elderly Patients with Dementia-Related PsychosisElderly patients with dementia-related psychosis treated with antipsychotic drugs are at an increased risk of death.

Prochlorperazine Suppositories, USP is not approved for the treatment of patients with dementia-related psychosis (see BOXED WARNING).The extrapyramidal symptoms which can occur secondary to prochlorperazine may be confused with the central nervous system signs of an undiagnosed primary disease responsible for the vomiting, e.g., Reye's syndrome or other encephalopathy.

The use of prochlorperazine and other potential hepatotoxins should be avoided in children and adolescents whose signs and symptoms suggest Reye's syndrome.Tardive Dyskinesia: Tardive dyskinesia, a syndrome consisting of potentially irreversible, involuntary, dyskinetic movements, may develop in patients treated with neuroleptic (anti-psychotic) drugs.

Although the prevalence of the syndrome appears to be highest among the elderly, especially elderly women, it is impossible to rely upon prevalence estimates to predict, at the inception of neuroleptic treatment, which patients are likely to develop the syndrome.

Whether neuroleptic drug products differ in their potential to cause tardive dyskinesia is unknown.Both the risk of developing the syndrome and the likelihood that it will become irreversible are believed to increase as the duration of treatment and the total cumulative dose of neuroleptic drugs administered to the patient increase.

However, the syndrome can develop, although much less commonly, after relatively brief treatment periods at low doses.There is no known treatment for established cases of tardive dyskinesia, although the syndrome may remit, partially or completely, if neuroleptic treatment is withdrawn.

Neuroleptic treatment itself, however, may suppress (or partially suppress) the signs and symptoms of the syndrome and thereby may possibly mask the underlying disease process.The effect that symptomatic suppression has upon the long-term course of the syndrome is unknown.Given these considerations, neuroleptics should be prescribed in a manner that is most likely to minimize the occurrence of tardive dyskinesia.

Chronic neuroleptic treatment should generally be reserved for patients who suffer from a chronic illness that, 1) is known to respond to neuroleptic drugs, and, 2) for whom alternative, equally effective, but potentially less harmful treatments are not available or appropriate.

In patients who do require chronic treatment, the smallest dose and the shortest duration of treatment producing a satisfactory clinical response should be sought.

The need for continued treatment should be reassessed periodically.If signs and symptoms of tardive dyskinesia appear in a patient on neuroleptics, drug discontinuation should be considered.

However, some patients may require treatment despite the presence of the syndrome.For further information about the description of tardive dyskinesia and its clinical detection, please refer to the sections on PRECAUTIONS and ADVERSE REACTIONS.Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome (NMS): A potentially fatal symptom complex sometimes referred to as Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome (NMS) has been reported in association with antipsychotic drugs.

Clinical manifestations of NMS are hyperpyrexia, muscle rigidity, altered mental status and evidence of autonomic instability (irregular pulse or blood pressure, tachycardia, diaphoresis, and cardiac dysrhythmias).The diagnostic evaluation of patients with this syndrome is complicated.

In arriving at a diagnosis, it is important to identify cases where the clinical presentation includes both serious medical illness (e.g., pneumonia, systemic infection, etc.) and untreated or inadequately treated extrapyramidal signs and symptoms (EPS).

Other important considerations in the differential diagnosis include central anticholinergic toxicity, heat stroke, drug fever and primary central nervous system (CNS) pathology.The management of NMS should include 1) immediate discontinuation of antipsychotic drugs and other drugs not essential to concurrent therapy, 2) intensive symptomatic treatment and medical monitoring, and 3) treatment of any concomitant serious medical problems for which specific treatments are available.

There is no general agreement about specific pharmacological treatment regimens for uncomplicated NMS.If a patient requires antipsychotic drug treatment after recovery from NMS, the potential reintroduction of drug therapy should be carefully considered.

The patient should be carefully monitored, since recurrences of NMS have been reported.Patients with bone marrow depression or who have previously demonstrated a hypersensitivity reaction (e.g., blood dyscrasias, jaundice) with a phenothiazine should not receive any phenothiazine, including prochlorperazine unless in the judgment of the physician the potential benefits of treatment outweigh the possible hazards.Prochlorperazine may impair mental and/or physical abilities, especially during the first few days of therapy.

Therefore, caution patients about activities requiring alertness (e.g., operating vehicles or machinery).Phenothiazines may intensify or prolong the action of central nervous system depressants (e.g., alcohol, anesthetics, narcotics).Usage in Pregnancy: Safety for the use of prochlorperazine during pregnancy has not been established.

Therefore, prochlorperazine is not recommended for use in pregnant patients except in cases of severe nausea and vomiting that are so serious and intractable that, in the judgment of the physician, drug intervention is required and potential benefits outweigh possible hazards.There have been reported instances of prolonged jaundice, extrapyramidal signs, hyperreflexia or hyporeflexia in newborn infants whose mothers received phenothiazines.Nursing Mothers: There is evidence that phenothiazines are excreted in the breast milk of nursing mothers.
Branded Drugs
The following US Branded drugs contain Prochlorperazine


COMPAZINE -- GLAXOSMITHKLINE

COMPRO -- PADDOCK LABORATORIES INC


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