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Basic Drug Info
Drug Name:DORYX
Manufacturer:Warner Chilcott (US), Inc.
Other Info:Rx onlyManufactured by:Mayne Pharma International Pty Ltd1538 Main North RoadSalisbury South, South Australia 5106Marketed by:Warner Chilcott (US), Inc.Rockaway, NJ 07866Revised March 2007 0838G0110



Clinical Trials:


Indications and Usage

To reduce the development of drug-resistant bacteria and maintain the effectiveness of DORYX and other antibacterial drugs, DORYX should be used only to treat or prevent infections that are proven or strongly suspected to be caused by susceptible bacteria.

When culture and susceptibility information are available, they should be considered in selecting or modifying antibacterial therapy.

In the absence of such data, local epidemiology and susceptibility patterns may contribute to the empiric selection of therapy.
Infection -- Invasion of the host organism by microorganisms that can cause pathological conditions or diseases.

Contraindications
The drug is contraindicated in persons who have shown hypersensitivity to any of the tetracyclines.
Hypersensitivity -- Altered reactivity to an antigen, which can result in pathologic reactions upon subsequent exposure to that particular antigen.

Warnings

THE USE OF DRUGS OF THE TETRACYCLINE CLASS DURING TOOTH DEVELOPMENT (LAST HALF OF PREGNANCY, INFANCY AND CHILDHOOD TO THE AGE OF 8 YEARS) MAY CAUSE PERMANENT DISCOLORATION OF THE TEETH (YELLOW-GRAY-BROWN).

This adverse reaction is more common during long-term use of the drugs but it has been observed following repeated short-term courses.

Enamel hypoplasia has also been reported.

TETRACYCLINE DRUGS, THEREFORE, SHOULD NOT BE USED IN THIS AGE GROUP, EXCEPT FOR ANTHRAX, INCLUDING INHALATIONAL ANTHRAX (POST-EXPOSURE), UNLESS OTHER DRUGS ARE NOT LIKELY TO BE EFFECTIVE OR ARE CONTRAINDICATED.Clostridium difficile associated diarrhea (CDAD) has been reported with use of nearly all antibacterial agents, including DORYX® Capsules, 75 mg and 100 mg, and may range in severity from mild diarrhea to fatal colitis.

Treatment with antibacterial agents alters the normal flora of the colon leading to overgrowth of C.

difficile.C.

difficile produces toxins A and B which contribute to the development of CDAD.

Hypertoxin producing strains of C.

difficile cause increased morbidity and mortality, as these infections can be refractory to antimicrobial therapy and may require colectomy.

CDAD must be considered in all patients who present with diarrhea following antibiotic use.

Careful medical history is necessary since CDAD has been reported to occur over two months after the administration of antibacterial agents.If CDAD is suspected or confirmed, ongoing antibiotic use not directed against C.

difficile may need to be discontinued.

Appropriate fluid and electrolyte management, protein supplementation, antibiotic treatment of C.

difficile, and surgical evaluation should be instituted as clinically indicated.All tetracyclines form a stable calcium complex in any bone-forming tissue.

A decrease in fibula growth rate has been observed in prematures given oral tetracycline in doses of 25 mg/kg every six hours.

This reaction was shown to be reversible when the drug was discontinued.Results of animal studies indicate that tetracyclines cross the placenta, are found in fetal tissues and can have toxic effects on the developing fetus (often related to retardation of skeletal development).

Evidence of embryotoxicity has been noted in animals treated early in pregnancy.

If any tetracycline is used during pregnancy or if the patient becomes pregnant while taking these drugs, the patient should be apprised of potential hazard to the fetus.The antianabolic action of the tetracyclines may cause an increase in BUN.

Studies to date indicate that this does not occur with the use of doxycycline in patients with impaired renal function.Photosensitivity manifested by an exaggerated sunburn reaction has been observed in some individuals taking tetracyclines.

Patients apt to be exposed to direct sunlight or ultraviolet light should be advised that this reaction can occur with tetracycline drugs, and treatment should be discontinued at the first evidence of skin erythema.

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